What Are The Best Bone Broth Recipes?

Liquid gold. Superfood. Bone broth is notorious for its incredibly high nutritional value. It comes from bones being the storehouses of essential nutrients such as calcium and magnesium, as well as a source of collagen and gelatine, which are two nutrients that support skin, joints, and gut health. Besides being used in soups, sauces, and gravies, it is now regaining its popularity as a health drink. We have a wide range of best bone broth recipes at Bone Broth

Wondering how to make one? You came to the right place because we have gathered the best recipes all in the same place.

But before jumping in, here’s a short disclaimer:

It is important to know that you can get creative with the ingredients – you can’t really go wrong. Feel free to follow the given recipes fully, or use them as an inspiration for your significant broth. You can mix up different bones, add your favourite herbs and veggies and of course, avoid the ones you don’t like.

Also, if you’re planning to add your broth to let’s say, smoothies, consider adding less salt and herbs, and if you use your broth for soups, you can spice it up for that extra flavour.

 

Keto stovetop bone broth

Ingredients

  • 2 carrots, peeled and diced
  • 4 celery stalks, chopped
  • 1 onion, peeled and chopped
  • 2 lbs (1 Kg) beef bones
  • 1 Tablespoon (7 g) gelatin powder (optional)
  • Salt, to taste

Instructions

  1. Add everything to a large pot and fill with water.
  2. Bring to a boil and then reduce to a simmer with the lid on.
  3. Keep simmering for 6 hours on low heat. Top with additional water if needed.
  4. Cool, sieve the liquid out, and store the bone broth in glass jars.
  5. Fill the pot with more water and simmer for another 6 hours.

 

Chicken Bone Broth

You only need the simplest of ingredients to make this nourishing, savoury chicken bone broth. You can sip it on its own and seasoned with a sprinkling of sea salt, or use it as the foundation for soups, stews or sauces.

Ingredients

  • Leftover bones of 1 roast chicken
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • Water to cover

Instructions

  1. Place the chicken bones into a stockpot. Pour in the wine, and cover with water by two inches.
  2. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, and then immediately turn the heat to medium-low. Allow the broth to simmer, ever so slightly, at least eight and up to twelve hours.
  3. Remove the pot from the heat.
  4. Strain the broth, and discard the bones.
  5. Use immediately, or transfer the broth to jars and store in the fridge up to 1 week.

 

Bone Broth – Stove Top Method 

Ingredients

  • 3.5-lb to 4-lb of bones (chicken, turkey, beef, pork, lamb etc.) – see notes above
  • 2 or 3 handfuls of any vegetable odds and ends you have on hand like onions, carrots, celery, leeks etc., chopped up a few times to fit into the pot
  • Small handful of shiitake mushrooms, optional
  • Splash of apple cider vinegar, optional
  • Water

Method

  1. Put the bones in a large stockpot and fill with cold tap water up to 2″ above the bones, but leaving room at the top of the pot to avoid boil-over. Place the pot on the stove over high heat until it comes to a rolling boil and foam starts rising to the surface. Boil for another few minutes up to 15 minutes. You should see foam at the top, and this is the scum from the bones.
  2. You have 2 options to rid the scum:
  3. The first option (my preferred): Dump the entire contents of the pot (bones and water) into a colander inside the sink. Be careful of the steam and not to splash yourself! Wash the pot thoroughly, and you don’t want any of that scum inside your beautiful broth. Place the bones back into the clean stockpot and fill with fresh cold tap water up to 2″ above the bones. Bring the water back to a rolling boil over high heat.
  4. Second option: Do not dump out the original water. Turn heat down to simmer. Skim the scum continuously with a mesh sieve, rinsing the sieve out in a bowl filled with water in between, until no more scum rises to the top.   
  5. Once the scum has been removed, toss in your vegetables, shiitake mushrooms (if using) and a splash of vinegar (if using). The vinegar is said to help extract trace minerals from the bones during cooking. Don’t worry, and you won’t taste it in the final broth.
  6. Adjust the heat until you are getting a very gentle simmer with the lid on, in other words, at a level when the bubbles barely break the water’s surface. [ Update: previously my direction was to simmer for the first 15-20 minutes before turning it down for the remaining time, but I have stopped doing that completely, to avoid any breakdown of the proteins in the gelatin which can happen due to excessive heat ].
  7. For small bones like chicken, simmer for anywhere between 6-12 hours, but I like to go 24hrs. For larger bones like beef, pork and lamb, simmer between 12 to 24 hours, or more until the bones are softened. A good way to check if you’ve extracted as much out of the bones as possible is to see if the bone gives when you squeeze it between your fingers. 
  8. Strain the broth over a fine mesh strainer to ensure all the bones bits are removed. Use right away or cool and store in the fridge for a few days, or freeze for up to 6 months. See notes above for freezing tips.

 

How To Make Chicken Bone Broth – Stovetop and Slow Cooker

Ingredients

  • 3 pounds chicken bones and pieces, such as roast chicken bones, chicken backbones, and chicken wings
  • 2 tablespoons white vinegar
  • 1 large onion, peeled and halved
  • 1 large carrot, peeled and chopped
  • 3 quarts filtered water

Equipment

  • Baking sheet
  • Scale
  • Chef’s knife and cutting board
  • Large stockpot or 6-quart slow cooker
  • Strainer
  • Ice

Stovetop Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F and rinse the bones. Arrange a rack in the middle of the oven and heat to 400°F. Place the bones in a colander, rinse under cool water, and pat dry with paper towels. Looking for bone broth recipes ? Look no further! Bone Broth has you covered.
  2. Roast the bones for 30 minutes. Arrange the bones in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet. Roast until golden brown, about 30 minutes.
  3. Cover the bones with water and the vinegar and rest for 30 minutes. Transfer the hot bones to a large stockpot. Add the water and vinegar and stir to combine. Cover and let sit for 30 minutes.
  4. Bring the pot to a simmer over high heat. Bring the water to a rapid simmer over high heat.
  5. Skim the broth for the first hour. Immediately turn the heat down to the lowest setting possible. Check the pot occasionally, skimming off any foam that collects on the surface and adding additional water as needed to keep the ingredients covered. Cover and keep the broth at a low simmer for 24 hours.
  6. Add the onions and carrots and cook for another 12 to 24 hours. Add the carrots and onions and continue to simmer for 12 to 24 hours more, adding more filtered water as needed to keep the bones covered. The broth is done when it is a rich golden-brown, and the bones are falling apart at the joints.
  7. Strain the bone broth. When the broth is finished, strain and cool the bone broth as quickly as possible. Set a strainer over a large pot or even a stand mixer bowl and line it with cheesecloth if desired. Carefully strain the bone broth into it. Discard the spent bits of bone and vegetables.
  8. Cool the bone broth and store. Prepare an ice bath by either filling a sink or basin with cold water and ice and set the pot of broth inside the ice bath. Stir regularly until the broth is cooled to about 50°F, about 15 minutes. Transfer the broth to airtight containers or jars. Refrigerate or freeze.

Slow Cooker Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F and rinse the bones. Arrange a rack in the middle of the oven and heat to 400°F. Place the bones in a colander, rinse under cool water, and pat dry with paper towels.
  2. Roast the bones for 30 minutes. Arrange the bones in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet. Roast until golden brown, about 30 minutes.
  3. Cover the bones with 3 quarts of cool water and the vinegar and rest for 30 minutes. Transfer the bones to a 6-quart or larger slow cooker. Add the water and vinegar and stir to combine. Cover and let sit for 30 minutes.
  4. Bring to a simmer on the HIGH setting. Turn the slow cooker to the HIGH setting high and bring the broth mixture to a simmer.
  5. Skim the broth for the first hour. Check the slow cooker occasionally, skimming off any foam that collects on the surface the first hour and adding additional water as needed to keep the ingredients covered. Keep the broth at a low simmer on HIGH for 24 hours.
  6. Add the onions and carrots and cook for another 12 to 24 hours. Add the carrots and onions and continue to simmer on the HIGH setting for 12 to 24 hours more, adding more filtered water as needed to keep the bones covered. The broth is done when it is a rich golden-brown, and the bones are falling apart at the joints.
  7. Strain the bone broth. When the broth is finished, strain and cool the bone broth as quickly as possible. Set a strainer over a large pot or even a stand mixer bowl and line it with cheesecloth if desired. Carefully strain the bone broth into it. Discard the spent bits of bone and vegetables.
  8. Cool the bone broth and store. Prepare an ice bath by either filling a sink or basin with cold water and ice and set the pot of broth inside the ice bath. Stir regularly until the broth is cooled to about 50°F, about 15 minutes. Transfer the broth to airtight containers or jars. Refrigerate or freeze.

RECIPE NOTES

Filtered water: We used filtered water for more neutral testing. If you’ve got great-tasting tap or well water, feel free to use it here. Water filtered with a filter or faucet filter works well; bottled, filtered water is not required.

Storing and reheating: The broth can be refrigerated for up to 5 days or frozen for up to 3 months. To reheat, pour out as much broth as you’d like and reheat it gently on the stove or in the microwave.

Reducing bone broth for storage: To save on freezer space, you can simmer the broth over low heat on the stovetop until it’s reduced by half. Keep it at a very bare simmer — you should see just a few bubbles as it simmers. Make a note on the freezer container that the broth needs to be thinned with water before using.

 

PERPETUAL BEEF BONE BROTH

Making perpetual beef broth could not be simpler, but it does require time. Before you get intimidated, know that in return for your efforts, you’ll gain rich, flavorful stock that is high in minerals, nutrients, gut-healing gelatin, and more. Bone broth is also super affordable when you consider that a handful of bones becomes the base of dinners all week.

Ingredients

  • Beef Bones*
  • Filtered Water
  • 2 to 3 teaspoons Apple Cider Vinegar
  • Optional: any herbs, fresh vegetable peelings, etc. you have on hand

Instruction

  1. Start by setting your largest stockpot on the stove and setting your beef bones inside. Add enough filtered water to cover the bones completely, and bring the water to a boil over medium heat.
  2. Add a few teaspoons of apple cider vinegar, and reduce heat to low, letting the pot simmer, uncovered –for several days and up to a full week. As it cooks, scum will rise to the top; use a spoon to skim it off and discard. Whenever the liquids get low, add more water.
  3. Whenever you want soup for dinner, ladle some broth out of the pot and use it as you like. Bone Broth has a wide range of best bone broth recipes in Melbourne
  4. Continue this process until the bones are completely brittle and dried out so that you could crumble them between your thumb and your forefinger. Brittleness is an indication that the minerals and amino acids you’ve wanted to pull from the bones have been removed, and the bones have done their job for you. (I did this in two pots, and, in one, the bones were dry, brittle, and full of holes in 3 full days. In the other, it took a few days longer.)
  5. Strain the mixture and discard the bones and scraps. Set in glass jars, broth may be refrigerated (for use that week) or frozen (for later use).

 

Kellyann Beef Bone Broth

In her own words: “Bone broth isn’t just broth. And it isn’t just soup. It’s concentrated healing. This broth is nutrient-rich “liquid gold,” one of the world’s oldest and most powerful medicinal foods.”

Dr. Kellyann Petrucci came to realize the ancient power of collagen and bone broth to heal the gut and slow aging while studying biological medicine at the Marion Foundation and Paracelsus Clinic, Switzerland. By focusing her practice on a lifestyle that stops and reverses inflammation, Dr. Kellyann is able to help patients and readers reduce dangerous belly fat to become slimmer, younger, and healthier.

You’ll need:

  • 2 unpeeled carrots, scrubbed and roughly chopped
  • 2 stalks celery, including leafy part, roughly chopped
  • 1 medium onion, roughly chopped
  • 7 cloves garlic, peeled and smashed
  • 3½ pounds grass-fed beef bones (preferably joints and knuckles)
  • 2 dried bay leaves
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar

Directions:

  1. Place all the vegetables and the garlic, bones, and bay leaves into a large pot on the stove or in a slow cooker. Sprinkle on the salt, drizzle with vinegar, and add enough water to cover everything by 1 inch (about 13 cups).
  2. Cook for 12 to 24 hours on low. Check out our Melbourne bone broth recipes here.
  3. Use a shallow spoon to skim the film off the top of the broth carefully. Pour the broth through a fine strainer and discard the solids. Taste the broth and add more salt as needed.
  4. The broth will keep for 3 days in the fridge and 3 months in your freezer.

We hope your findings were successful and you’re already on your way to the store or market to get your broth ingredients!

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