Bone

How Do You Make Bone Broth?

In the last few years, bone broth has become a grocery store staple. While you could always find beef broth or stock in the soup aisle of your grocery store, it wasn’t until recently that you could find bone broth being sold as well, let alone being served like a latté at the coffee counter. We have a wide range of best bone broth recipes at Bone Broth. We have our wellness-minded, Paleo-eating friends to thank for reviving our love and admiration for this long-cooked homemade stock. Bone broth is essentially a deeper, richer beef stock made by simmering collagen-rich beef bones until you end up with a rich, nutritious and deeply savoury broth.

It’s the kind of thing that’s perfect for sipping from a mug on a cold day, or for dressing up and turning into a hearty soup for dinner. Want to try making it yourself? Let’s do it!

 

Beef Bone Broth

The longer you cook this nourishing broth, the more savoury and concentrated it will become. Roasting the bones and vegetables beforehand will add even more flavour and richness. Season with salt and sip this restorative broth on its own, use it as a cooking liquid for grains or legumes, or as a base for sauces and soups like hearty, healthy Detox Pho.

Ingredients

  • 2kg beef marrow bones
  • 2 medium carrots, no need to chop as they will break up in the long cook
  • 1 leek, washed well
  • 1 medium onion
  • 1 garlic head
  • 3 celery stalks
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 2 tablespoons black peppercorns
  • 2 tablespoon cider vinegar

Preparation

  1. Roast the bones at 200C for about 30 minutes, until they  develop some colour – this will give the broth a richer flavour
  2. Add the roasted bones, vegetables and other ingredients  to a deep pot and cover with filtered water
  3. Cover the pot and bring to a gentle boil.
  4. Reduce heat to a very low simmer and cook, skimming foam and excess fat occasionally, for at least 8 but up to 24 hours on the stovetop or a slow cooker.
  5. The longer you simmer it, the better your broth will be.
  6.  Add more water if necessary to ensure bones and vegetables are fully submerged. 
  7. Remove the pot from the heat and let cool before straining 
  8. Discard bones and vegetables

 

Chicken Bone Broth

Ingredients

  • 2 chicken carcases from you butcher
  • Filtered water
  • 2 Tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • 1 generous pinch each sea salt and black pepper
  • rosemary/herbs 
  • 1 lemon 

 

Instructions

  1. To a large pot or Dutch oven, add the bones leftover from a whole roasted chicken (including legs and wings that may have been on the serving platter), or the bones from 1 chicken purchased from a butcher. (Note: This can also be done in a Crock-Pot or Instant Pot.)
  2. We also like adding the lemon wedges and rosemary that were cooked with our whole roasted chicken (optional).
  3. Top with filtered water until generously covered (about 12 cups / 2880 ml). This should reduce down by about 1/3 or 1/2, leaving you with 6-8 cups of bone broth.
  4. Next, add in a bit of salt and pepper to season the broth (you can add more later to taste).
  5. Then add apple cider vinegar, which is added primarily because the acidity breaks down the collagen and makes it more abundant in the broth. You can also sub lemon juice, but we prefer apple cider vinegar.
  6. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cover. Cook for at least 10-12 hours, or until reduced by 1/3 to 1/2. The more it reduces, the more intense the flavour will become, and the more collagen will be extracted. We find 12 hours to be about right.
  7. Strain and discard the bones. Either use immediately or store in glass jars and freeze up to 1-2 months or more. Just be sure to leave a couple of inches at the top of the jar to allow for expansion in the freezer.

Note: Bone broth typically gelatinizes when refrigerated because of the collagen content. But don’t worry — that’s normal. When reheated, it liquefies once again, just like store-bought chicken broth.

 

How To Make Bone Broth on the Stove or in the Slow Cooker

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds mixed beef bones, short ribs, oxtails, knuckles, and neck bones (see Recipe Note)
  • 3 quarts filtered water, plus more as needed to cover
  • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1 large carrot
  • 1 large yellow onion

Equipment

  • Baking sheet
  • Tongs
  • Chef’s knife
  • Large stockpot or 6-quart or larger slow cooker
  • Strainer
  • Cheesecloth (optional)

Instruction

Stovetop Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F and rinse the bones. Arrange a rack in the middle of the oven and heat to 400°F. Place the bones in a colander, rinse under cool water, and pat dry with paper towels. Looking for bone broth recipes ? Look no further! Bone Broth has you covered.
  2. Roast the bones for 30 minutes. Arrange the bones in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet. Roast until golden brown, about 30 minutes.
  3. Cover the bones with water and the vinegar and rest for 30 minutes. Transfer the hot bones to a large stockpot. Add the water and vinegar and stir to combine. Cover and let sit for 30 minutes.
  4. Bring the pot to a simmer over high heat. Bring the water to a rapid simmer over high heat.
  5. Skim the broth for the first hour. Immediately turn the heat down to the lowest setting possible. Check the pot occasionally, skimming off any foam that collects on the surface and adding additional water as needed to keep the ingredients covered. Cover and keep the broth at a low simmer for 24 hours.
  6. Add the onions and carrots and cook for another 12 to 24 hours. Add the carrots and onions and continue to simmer for 12 to 24 hours more, adding more filtered water as needed to keep the bones covered. The broth is done when it is a rich golden-brown, and the bones are falling apart at the joints.
  7. Strain the bone broth. When the broth is finished, strain and cool the bone broth as quickly as possible. Set a strainer over a large pot or even a stand mixer bowl and line it with cheesecloth if desired. Carefully strain the bone broth into it. Discard the spent bits of bone and vegetables.
  8. Cool the bone broth and store. Prepare an ice bath by either filling a sink or basin with cold water and ice and set the pot of broth inside the ice bath. Stir regularly until the broth is cooled to about 50°F, about 15 minutes. Transfer the broth to airtight containers or jars. Refrigerate or freeze.

Slow Cooker Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F and rinse the bones. Arrange a rack in the middle of the oven and heat to 400°F. Place the bones in a colander, rinse under cool water, and pat dry with paper towels.
  2. Roast the bones for 30 minutes. Arrange the bones in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet. Roast until golden brown, about 30 minutes.
  3. Cover the bones with 3 quarts cool water and the vinegar and rest for 30 minutes. Transfer the bones to a 6-quart or larger slow cooker. Add the water and vinegar and stir to combine. Cover and let sit for 30 minutes.
  4. Bring to a simmer on the HIGH setting. Turn the slow cooker to the HIGH setting high and bring the broth mixture to a simmer.
  5. Skim the broth for the first hour. Check the slow cooker occasionally, skimming off any foam that collects on the surface the first hour and adding additional water as needed to keep the ingredients covered. Keep the broth at a low simmer on HIGH for 24 hours.
  6. Add the onions and carrots and cook for another 12 to 24 hours. Add the carrots and onions and continue to simmer on the HIGH setting for 12 to 24 hours more, adding more filtered water as needed to keep the bones covered. The broth is done when it is a rich golden-brown, and the bones are falling apart at the joints.
  7. Strain the bone broth. When the broth is finished, strain and cool the bone broth as quickly as possible. Set a strainer over a large pot or even a stand mixer bowl and line it with cheesecloth if desired. Carefully strain the bone broth into it. Discard the spent bits of bone and vegetables.
  8. Cool the bone broth and store. Prepare an ice bath by either filling a sink or basin with cold water and ice and set the pot of broth inside the ice bath. Stir regularly until the broth is cooled to about 50°F, about 15 minutes. Transfer the broth to airtight containers or jars. Refrigerate or freeze.

Recipe Notes

Bones for bone broth: You can use any mix of beef, pork, or chicken bones for making bone broth. Adding some meaty bones, like short ribs or ham bones, will make a richer-tasting broth; you can also use the meat from the bones in other dishes.

Filtered water: We used filtered water for more neutral testing. If you’ve got great-tasting tap or well water, feel free to use it here. Water filtered with a filter or faucet filter works well; bottled, filtered water is not required.

Storing and reheating: The broth can be refrigerated for up to 5 days or frozen for up to 3 months. To reheat, pour out as much broth as you’d like and reheat it gently on the stove or in the microwave.

Reducing bone broth for storage: To save on freezer space, you can simmer the broth over low heat on the stovetop until it’s reduced by half. Keep it at a very bare simmer — you should see just a few bubbles as it simmers. Make a note on the freezer container that the broth needs to be thinned with water before using.

Bone Broth Recipe (Stove Top or Instant Pot)

Make nourishing bone broth at home simmered on the stovetop or in the Instant Pot in a fraction of the time.

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs bones from a healthy source
  • 2 chicken feet (optional)
  • 1 gal water
  • 2 TBSP apple cider vinegar
  • 1 onion
  • 2 carrots
  • 2 stalks of celery
  • 1 TBSP salt (optional)
  • 1 tsp peppercorns (optional)
  • herbs and spices (to taste, optional)
  • 2 cloves garlic (optional)
  • 1 bunch parsley (optional)

Instructions

  1. If you are using raw bones, especially beef bones, it improves flavour to roast them in the oven first. I place them in a roasting pan and roast for 30 minutes at 350°F.
  2. Place the bones in a large stockpot or the Instant Pot.
  3. Pour cool filtered water and the vinegar over the bones. Let sit for 20-30 minutes in the cool water. The acid helps make the nutrients in the bones more available.
  4. Rough chop and add the onion, carrots, and celery to the pot.
  5. Add any salt, pepper, spices, or herbs, if using.

Stove Top

  1. Bring the broth to a boil. Once it has reached a vigorous boil, reduce to a simmer and simmer until done.
  2. During the first few hours of simmering, you’ll need to remove the impurities that float to the surface. A frothy/foamy layer will form, and it can be easily scooped off with a big spoon. Throw this part away. I typically check it every 20 minutes for the first 2 hours to remove this. Grass-fed and healthy animals will produce much less of this than conventional animals.
  3. Simmer for 8 hours for fish broth, 24 hours for chicken, or 48 hours for beef.
  4. During the last 30 minutes, add the garlic and parsley, if using.
  5. Remove from heat and let cool slightly. Strain using a fine metal strainer to remove all the bits of bone and vegetable. When cool enough, store in a gallon size glass jar in the fridge for up to 5 days, or freeze for later use.

Instant Pot

  1. Add the garlic and parsley to the pot if using, place the lid on the pot, and set valve to sealing.
  2. Cook at high pressure for 2 hours, followed by either a quick release or natural pressure release. Either is fine. Bone Broth has a wide range of best bone broth recipes in Melbourne
  3. Let cool slightly, strain, and store in a gallon size glass jar in the fridge for up to 5 days, or freeze for later use.

 

How to Make Bone Broth (Instant Pot, Slow Cooker, & Stovetop Recipes)

Bone broth is an incredible medicinal food that is easy to make at home. Learn how to make bone broth in your Instant Pot, slow cooker, or on your stovetop!

Ingredients

  • 2-3 pounds chicken, turkey, pork, beef, lamb, or other bones (try to get bones that have lots of connective tissue—feet, knuckles, necks, backs, etc.)
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 4 cups roughly chopped carrots, onions, and celery (or scraps)
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1/2 teaspoon peppercorns
  • 1 teaspoon of sea salt
  • Filtered water

Instructions

If using raw bones, preheat the oven to 425°F. Layout bones in one layer on a large baking sheet. Bake in a preheated oven for 25-30 minutes, or until golden brown.

Stovetop:

  1. In a large soup pan or Dutch oven, place the bones, apple cider vinegar, carrots, onions, celery, bay leaves, peppercorns, and salt.
  2. Fill the pot with filtered water until it covers the bones by about an inch. Let the mixture rest for 30 minutes.
  3. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat, then reduce heat to as low as your stove will go. You want it just to be barely bubbling. Cover with the lid slightly ajar and cook for 24 hours for poultry bones and 48 hours for red meat bones. If cooking overnight on the stove makes you nervous, you can place the whole pot (covered) in the fridge overnight, and restart the cooking time in the morning.
  4. When cooking time is up, strain through a fine-mesh sieve, and transfer to jars for storing in the fridge or freezer.
  5. Once chilled, the broth should be jiggly and have a layer of fat on top. Scrape off the fat and use it for other purposes, if desired.

Instant Pot:

  1. In the basin of an Instant Pot, place the bones, apple cider vinegar, carrots, onions, celery, bay leaves, peppercorns, and salt.
  2. Fill the pot with filtered water until it covers the bones by about an inch (or to the max fill line on the Instant Pot—whichever comes first). Let the mixture rest for 30 minutes.
  3. Close lid and turn knob to sealing, set to cook on low pressure for 3 hours for poultry bones or 4 hours for red meat bones. When time is up, let the pressure release naturally.
  4. Strain broth through a fine-mesh sieve, and transfer to jars for storing in the fridge or freezer.
  5. Once chilled, the broth should be jiggly and have a layer of fat on top. Scrape off the fat and use it for other purposes, if desired.

Slow Cooker:

  1. In the basin of a slow cooker, place the bones, apple cider vinegar, carrots, onions, celery, bay leaves, peppercorns, and salt.
  2. Fill a pot with filtered water until it covers the bones by about an inch. Let the mixture rest for 30 minutes.
  3. Cover with the lid slightly ajar, and cook on low for 24 hours for poultry bones and 48 hours for red meat bones.
  4. Strain broth through a fine-mesh sieve, and transfer to jars for storing in the fridge or freezer.
  5. Once chilled, the broth should be jiggly and have a layer of fat on top. Scrape off the fat and use it for other purposes, if desired.

Notes

  • You can optionally blanch your raw bones before roasting them by submerging them in boiling water for 10-15 minutes. This is to remove some of the impurities that can cause the flavour of the final broth to go off. I tend to do this when making beef broth but not with chicken broth—test out both ways and see what works best for you.
  • When making beef broth, I like to add in 2 tablespoons of soy sauce or coconut aminos, 1 cup roughly chopped mushrooms, and about 2 tablespoons of tomato paste—this helps create a richer flavour.
  • I tend to avoid putting garlic in my bone broth because it can be very overpowering when cooked for that long. If you do want to add garlic, add a single clove in the last hour or so of cooking.
  • My slow cooker runs too hot on Low and too cold on Warm to make good bone broth—so make sure to keep an eye on yours.
  • If you’re short on time, I like to keep some of Kettle & Fire’s Bone Broth on hand, but feel free to try other bone broth brands. Check out our Melbourne bone broth recipes here.

Homemade Broth/Stock can be used as the liquid in making soups, stews, gravies, sauces, and reductions. It can also be used to saute or roast vegetables.

We try to drink at least 1 cup per person per day as a health boost, especially in the winter. My favourite way is to heat 8-16 ounces with a little salt and sometimes whisk in an egg until cooked (makes a soup like egg drop soup).

In times of illness (which doesn’t happen often) we will usually just drink bone broth until we start feeling better as it supports the body but is very easy to digest so the body’s energy can go to healing. In cases of stomach bugs or vomiting, bone broth often calms the stomach very quickly and helps shorten the duration of the illness.

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